Request Tracker

So, I’ve kind of taken over Request Tracker (

Initially I took it because I’m interested in using RT at work to take track customer service emails. All I did at the time was bump the version and remove old, insecure versions from the tree.

However, as I’ve finally gotten around to working on getting it setup, I’ve discovered there were a lot of issues that had gone unreported.

The intention is for RT to run out of its virtual host root, like /var/www/localhost/rt-4.2.9/bin/rt and configured by /var/www/localhost/rt-4.2.9/etc/, and for it to reference any supplementary packages with ${VHOST_ROOT} as its root. However, because of a broken install process and a broken hook script used by webapp-config that didn’t happen. Further, the rt_apache.conf included by us was outdated by a few years, too, which in itself isn’t a bad thing, except that it was wrong for RT 4+.

I spent much longer than I care to admit trying to figure out why my settings weren’t sticking when I edited I was trying to run RT under its own path rather than on a subdomain, but Set($WebPath, ‘/rt’) wasn’t doing what it should.

It also complained about not being able to write to /usr/share/webapps/rt/rt-4.2.9/data/mason_data/obj, which clearly wasn’t right.

Once I tried moving to /usr/share/webapps/rt/rt-4.2.9/etc/, and chmod and chown on ../data/mason_data/obj, everything worked as it should.

Knowing this was wrong and that it would prevent anyone using our package from having multiple installation, aka vhosts, I set out to fix it.

It was a descent into madness. Things I expected to happen did not. Things that shouldn’t have been a problem were. Much of the trouble I had circled around webapp-config and webapp.eclass.

But, I prevailed, and now you can really have multiple RT installations side-by-side. Also, I’ve added an article ( to our wiki with updated instructions on getting RT up and running.

Caveat: I didn’t use FastCGI, so that part may be wrong still, but mod_perl is good to go.

One Severe and Multiple Security Fixes – PostgreSQL

If you’re using dev-db/postgresql-server, update now.

CVE-2013-1899 <dev-db/postgresql-server-{9.2.4,9.1.9,9.0.13}
A connection request containing a database name that begins
with "-" may be crafted to damage or destroy files within a server's data directory.

CVE-2013-1900 <dev-db/postgresql-server-{9.2.4,9.1.9,9.0.13,8.4.17}
Random numbers generated by contrib/pgcrypto functions may be easy for another
database user to guess

CVE-2013-1901 <dev-db/postgresql-server-{9.2.4,9.1.9}
An unprivileged user can run commands that could interfere with in-progress backups.