rav1e and crav1e – A fast and safe AV1 encoder – Some HowTo

Over the year I contributed to an AV1 encoder written in rust.

Here a small tutorial about what is available right now, there is still lots to do, but I think we could enjoy more user-feedback (and possibly also some help).

Setting up

Install the rust toolchain

If you do not have rust installed, it is quite simple to get a full environment using rustup

$ curl https://sh.rustup.rs -sSf | sh
# Answer the questions asked and make sure you source the `.profile` file created.
$ source ~/.profile

Install cmake, perl and nasm

rav1e uses libaom for testing and and on x86/x86_64 some components have SIMD variants written directly using nasm.

You may follow the instructions, or just install:
nasm (version 2.13 or better)
perl (any recent perl5)
cmake (any recent version)

Once you have those dependencies in you are set.

Building rav1e

We use cargo, so the process is straightforward:

## Pull in the customized libaom if you want to run all the tests
$ git submodule update --init

## Build everything
$ cargo build --release

## Test to make sure everything works as intended
$ cargo test --features decode_test --release

## Install rav1e
$ cargo install

Using rav1e

Right now rav1e has a quite simple interface:

rav1e 0.1.0
AV1 video encoder

USAGE:
    rav1e [OPTIONS]  --output 

FLAGS:
    -h, --help       Prints help information
    -V, --version    Prints version information

OPTIONS:
    -I, --keyint     Keyframe interval [default: 30]
    -l, --limit                  Maximum number of frames to encode [default: 0]
        --low_latency      low latency mode. true or false [default: true]
    -o, --output                Compressed AV1 in IVF video output
        --quantizer                 Quantizer (0-255) [default: 100]
    -r 
    -s, --speed                  Speed level (0(slow)-10(fast)) [default: 3]
        --tune                    Quality tuning (Will enforce partition sizes >= 8x8) [default: psnr]  [possible
                                        values: Psnr, Psychovisual]

ARGS:
        Uncompressed YUV4MPEG2 video input

It accepts y4m raw source and produces ivf files.

You can configure the encoder by setting the speed and quantizer levels.

The low_latency flag can be turned off to run some additional analysis over a set of frames and have additional quality gains.

Crav1e

While ave and gst-rs will use the rav1e crate directly, there are a number of software such as handbrake or vlc that would be much happier to consume a C API.

Thanks to the staticlib target and cbindgen is quite easy to produce a C-ABI library and its matching header.

Setup

crav1e is built using cargo, so nothing special is needed right now beside nasm if you are building it on x86/x86_64.

Build the library

This step is completely straightforward, you can build it as release:

$ cargo build --release

or as debug

$ cargo build

It will produce a target/release/librav1e.a or a target/debug/librav1e.a.
The C header will be in include/rav1e.h.

Try the example code

I provided a quite minimal sample case.

cc -Wall c-examples/simple_encoding.c -Ltarget/release/ -lrav1e -Iinclude/ -o c-examples/simple_encoding
./c-examples/simple_encoding

If it builds and runs correctly you are set.

Manually copy the .a and the .h

Currently cargo install does not work for our purposes, but it will change in the future.

$ cp target/release/librav1e.a /usr/local/lib
$ cp include/rav1e.h /usr/local/include/

Missing pieces

Right now crav1e works well enough but there are few shortcomings I’m trying to address.

Shared library support

The cdylib target does exist and produce a nearly usable library but there are some issues with soname support. I’m trying to address them with upstream, but it might take some time.

Meanwhile some people suggest to use patchelf or similar tools to fix the library after the fact.

Install target

cargo is generally awesome, but sadly its support for installing arbitrary files to arbitrary paths is limited, luckily there are people proposing solutions.

pkg-config file generation

I consider a library not proper if a .pc file is not provided with it.

Right now there are means to extract the information need to build a pkg-config file, but there isn’t a simple way to do it.

$ cargo rustc -- --print native-static-libs

Provides what is needed for Libs.private, ideally it should be created as part of the install step since you need to know the prefix, libdir and includedir paths.

Coming next

Probably the next blog post will be about my efforts to make cargo able to produce proper cdylib or something quite different.

PS: If somebody feels to help me with matroska in AV1 would be great 🙂

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