Changing the passphrase for SSH keys in gpg-agent

Possibly the simplest way of changing the passhprase protecting a SSH key imported into gpg-agent is to use the Assuan passwd command:

echo passwd foo | gpg-connect-agent

where foo is the keygrip of your SSH key, which one can obtain from the file $GNUPGHOME/sshcontrol [1]. So far so good – but how does one know which of the keys listed in that file is the right one, especially if your sshcontrol list is fairly long? Here are the options I am aware of at this point:

Use the key comment. If you remember the contents of the comment field of the SSH key in question you can simply grep for it in all the files stored in $GNUPGHOME/private-keys-v1.d/ . Take the name of the file that matches, strip .key from the end and you’re set! Note that these are binary files so make sure your grep variant does not skip over them.

Use the MD5 fingerprint and the key comment. If for some reason you would rather not do the above you can take advantage of the fact that for SSH keys imported into gpg-agent the normal way, each keygrip line in sshcontrol is preceded by comment lines containing, among other things, the MD5 fingerprint of the imported key. Just tell ssh-add to print MD5 fingerprints for keys known to the agent instead of the default SHA256 ones:

ssh-add -E md5 -l

locate the fingerprint corresponding to the relevant key comment, then find the corresponding keygrip in sshcontrol .

Use the MD5 fingerprint and the public key. A slightly more complex variant of the above can be used if your SSH key pair in question has no comment but you still have the public key lying around. Start by running

ssh-add -L

and note the number of the line in which the public key in question shows up. The output of ssh-add -L and ssh-add -l is in the same order so you should have no trouble locating the corresponding MD5 fingerprint.

Bottom line: use meaningful comments for your SSH keys. It can really simplify key management in the long run.

[1] https://lists.gnupg.org/pipermail/gnupg-users/2007-July/031482.html

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